Fragment shader based interior mapping

 graphics, programming

Seems like everybody is excited about the fake interior mapping in Spiderman these days. Here is a Kotaku video showing them off: Now, the technique itself is nothing new, it's been proposed by Joost van Dongen who published a paper about it here. The idea is to divide the space into evenly sized "rooms" and then cast a ray in the fragment shader to figure out whether the ceiling/floor or a wall was hit, and then map a texture on top. It's super cool because it works without requiring extra geometry, the fragment shader is relatively cheap and easy to implement and like the Kotaku reviewer mentioned; The fact that the window is no longer just flat or a

Automatic detection of profiling tools

 debugging, programming

Let's say that you occasionally look at your application with NSight, VTune, or any other profiling tool of choice. Naturally you want to add debug markers into your application, but you might not necessarily ship with them or have them run at all when no profiling tool is attached. You could put them behind a command line flag, but I prefer automatic discovery: One build, when run with NSight, having all the debug markers I need to dissect a frame, and when run without NSight not doing any of that overhead. With X-Plane, there is another layer to that, and that is that specifically for NSight some features have to be disabled since they are making unsupported GL calls.So,

The curious case of 'ìe°[^]├UëÕ]Ús   UëÕâýj'

 firedrake, debugging, programming

11 months ago was the last time I touched firedrake, and last weekend the urge to mess with it caught me again. So I set up WSL, installed all necessary dependencies and opened firedrake. I fired up the last compiled version I had, just to remind myself of where I had left things, and I QEMU was happy to dump my debug printf()'s via the virtual UART into stdout. All was good. Then I compiled firedrake from scratch and it stopped working, or rather, it stopped producing output via the UART. That's strange, I thought, messed with a couple of things and also stashed all my git changes but no avail; No more output via the UART.Alright, debugger

Sushi - A Gameboy game

 gamejam, programming

This is a blogpost I've been meaning to write for a long time, it's about a game Nils and I wrote back in January 2017 for the Inno Games game Jam. That game jam happened together with the global game jam and the topic was: Waves. The source code for the game can be found here Nils and I both like challenges and even before going to the game jam we had decided to write a game for the original Gameboy (1989) and we decided to write it in assembler. This was inspired by the Ultimate Gameboy Talk on the 33c3 that happened in December of 2016, so we bought a Gameboy Advance and a Cartridge that is capable of

CLion 1.1 EAP

 programming

After writing about my thoughts on the CLion 1.0 release, I figured it’s only fair if I now also write about the new 1.1 EAP which Jetbrains released yesterday. I’ve only tested it for about an hour, but, I’m very very pleased with it! The parser The parser got some major improvements! It’s still not a Clang but something home cooked, but boy did they put some serious effort into it. It’s still not quite there, for example, it still has issues deducing potential side effects in lambdas properly, like in the following snippet: template<class T> void Enumerate(const std::function<void (T *, size_t, bool &)>&